Three Tips for Talking About Your Estate Plan During the Holidays

The holidays are right around the corner, bringing the joyous season of gathering with family and loved ones into full swing. It is the time to slow down, get caught up with loved ones, and enjoy the family and experience quality time around the dinner table. It is also a great idea to take this opportunity to review your estate plan and talk about the topic with your loved ones.

Do Not Be Indifferent. While the entire topic of estate planning can be a touchy subject, covering your eyes about the issue is not good for you or your family. According to a Caring.com survey from 2017, as many as six in 10 Americans do not have an estate planning document put together –  like a will or a trust. This is particularly alarming when it is estimated that $30 trillion in wealth is set to transfer between baby boomers and their heirs in the next few years. Read More

An Easy Three-Step Review for Your Estate Plan “Helpers”

While putting together an estate plan is important for you and your loved ones, it is equally important for you to understand the role of the trusted individuals who will be carrying out your wishes when you are unable to. When it comes to estate planning, these helpers are key. They generally include a trustee, guardian, executor, agent under a power of attorney, and healthcare proxy, among others.

Reviewing Your Key Helpers: Determining who will handle your affairs when you are unable or once you are gone is not a decision that should be taken lightly. Here is an easy three-step guide to help you that you can use when reviewing your estate plan. Read More

Three Keys to Protecting Yourself from a Rogue Executor

Unfortunately, sometimes a death in the family can bring out the worst in people. Inheritance theft is an underreported problem that can cost families dearly. To protect your inheritance, knowledge is key!, do a good job at documentation and get help. Read More

The One Thing Every New Grandparent MUST Do As Soon as Possible

Congratulations on welcoming the newest addition to your family. Being a new grandparent changes everything — including how you approach your finances — and is one of the most joyous occasions in life. The excitement of a new baby — and all of the firsts that come with this bundle of joy — can grab all of your attention and focus. That being said, there is one thing that every new grandparent must do as soon as possible that is often overlooked. Specifically, every new grandparent should immediately create (or revise) an estate plan so that it includes your family’s newest generation.

Having an intentional financial strategy for incorporating your new grandchild’s future in your overall estate plan is an important part of addressing your growing family’s needs. Read More

Three Tips for Protecting Your Important Legal Paperwork in a Natural Disaster

The past few years have been no stranger to natural disasters. From multiple earthquakes, back-to-back hurricanes, and raging wildfires, the United States and abroad have suffered serious natural disasters. These acts of nature can devastate your life and your family. Who knows what the coming years will bring?

In addition to creating a disaster preparedness plan for your family, be sure to protect your legal documents during these events. Below are several tips to follow so that you can ensure your important paperwork is safe if your home is damaged or destroyed in a natural disaster. Read More

Is now the time to remodel your old trust?

There are several reasons why you should update your existing trust or perhaps your entire estate plan. While estate planning documents do not necessarily have a shelf life, they may not fulfill your goals when your circumstances change. Of course, having estate planning documents that are up-to-date is critical, but how do you know when you should make changes?

It is important to note that just because you have a trust in place does not mean you are bound to keep it as is; this is even true if the trust was inherited from someone else. Indeed, there is more than one way to make necessary changes: sometimes you can establish a new trust or simply revise the terms of an existing trust. Finally, making changes to an existing trust – and other estate planning documents – can help you save money and costs, and it may allow you to make better investments decisions. Read More